• Throughout the "legal tampering period" into the start of the new league year on Wednesday, we'll be tracking, adding, and grading every free agent signing that actually happens (with players who have been released) and signings expected to happen (when we can actually report what's basically already happened. Check back often!

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    (Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports)

    Adrian Peterson, RB, Redskins

    Financial terms: 2years, $8 million

    Old team: Redskins

    At an age when most running backs are irrelevant or retired, the 33-year-old Peterson had his first 1,000-yard season since he led the league in rushing with 1,485 yards in 2015. Peterson doesn't have the jets he used to, but he's still quick enough, and brings savvy and power to Washington's run game. For the money allotted, this deal is a no-brainer.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

    Pierre Desir, CB, Colts

    Financial terms: 3 years, $25 million

    Old team: Colts

    Desir bounced around his first few years in the league, but fond a real schematic fit in Matt Eberflus' defense in 2018. Last season, he allowed 8 completions on 83 targets for 627 yards, two touchdowns, one interception, and an opposing quarterback rating of 84.8. A big, angular cornerback who is completely comfortable covering top receivers, Desir is just coming into his best game, and this is an outstanding deal for the Colts.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

    Mark Ingram, RB, Ravens

    Financial terms: 3 years, $15 million

    Old team: Saints

    The Ravens clearly want to have a run-heavy offense with second-year quarterback Lamar Jackson, and adding Ingram to rotation of Gus Edwards, Kenneth Dixon, and Jackson himself should work very nicely in Greg Roman's offense. Roman prefers zone elements with counter/trap power, and Ingram ran through just about every scheme during his eight years with the Saints. A true power back with marginal speed, Ingram will be a star in the red zone for the Ravens, and given the low contract, it's a good deal for Baltimore.

    Grade: B

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    (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

    Earl Thomas, Ravens

    Financial terms: 4 years, $55 million

    Old team: Seahawks

    Thomas has dealt with injuries over the last three seasons after barely missing a snap through his first six years, and when healthy, he's still been one of the best deep-third defenders in the league. Thomas has rare range from boundary to boundary and from the box down the seam-he can still do everything you want a modern free safety to do, and overall, he's the best coverage safety since Ed Reed. Interesting, of course, that he goes to Reed's old team. The Ravens have lost a lot of talent in free agency, and Thomas' age (he'll turn 30 in May) and injury history raise concerns, but Thomas has enough left in the tank to be a truly special player as he was before.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

    Le'Veon Bell, RB, Jets

    Financial terms: 4 years, $52.5 million

    Old team: Steelers

    One of the best at his position in the NFL from 2014 through 2017, Bell is that rare back with power, speed, agility, and the ability to run nuanced routes as you would expect from a slot receiver. He missed the entire 2018 season holding out in hope for a new contract, and while there were rumors that his value had dropped as a result, the financials here show that this isn't the case. Bell will get $35 million guaranteed, which is the second-most for any running back on the current market, behind Todd Gurley's $45 million. If Bell is the player he was before his holdout, it's a worthy deal for one of the best players in football, even at a position many in the league see as relatively fungible.

    Grade: B

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    (Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports)

    Rodger Saffold, OG, Titans

    Financial terms: 4 years, $44 million

    Old team: Rams

    Saffold will make about what the top guards make per year with this deal, which has him at $11 million per year with $22.5 million guaranteed. He allowed just three sacks and 21 total pressures on 1,277 total snaps last season for the Rams, while providing above-average run-blocking. He's an obvious upgrade over Quinton Spain, who played left guard for the Titans last season, and he adds to a formidable line with tackles Taylor Lewan and Jack Conklin, and center Ben Jones. A big loss for the Rams here.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by James Chance/Getty Images)

    J.R. Sweezy, OG, Cardinals

    Financial terms: 2 years, $ TBA

    Old team: Seahawks

    Sweezy is past the point where he'll get a big payday like he did from the Buccaneers a couple years back, but he proved with the Seahawks last year that he's a serviceable guard in run-blocking. Pass protection has always been his issue, and the Rams especially ate his lunch in his department in 2018, so it's interesting that he'll remain in the NFC West. The Cardinals are probably betting low veteran money that Sweezy is better than the guards they had in 2018, and given that low bar, they may be right.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

    Matt Paradis, C, Panthers

    Financial terms: 3 years, $27 million

    Old team: Broncos

    Paradis lost half of his 2018 season to a broken ankle, but when he was on the field for the Broncos, he was the same player he's always been-a guy with outstanding power and agility for a quick zone-blocking scheme. He'll present a serious upgrade over Ryan Kalil, whose retired after a long and dignified career. The numbers on this deal represent an especially good bargain.

    Grade: A

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    (Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports)

    Bradley Roby, CB, Texans

    Financial terms: 1 year, $10 million

    Old team: Broncos

    The opposite of a contract-year player, Roby had his worst year in coverage for the Broncos in his five seasons in Denver in 2018, allowing 54 catches on 82 targets for 807 yards, six touchdowns, one interception and an opposing quarterback rating of 117.3, per PFF. Ideally, Roby is a situational outside cornerback who can excel in slot roles. He may not ever be a consistent 1,000-snap outside guy in his career, but he does provide value on a "prove-it" deal, and the Texans are desperate for cornerbacks at this point.

    Grade: B-

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    (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

    Breshad Perriman, WR, Browns

    Financial terms: 1 year, $4 million

    Old team: Browns

    The former first-round pick didn't do much for the Ravens, but had a few solid moments for the Browns after Freddie Kitchens took over for Todd Haley in Cleveland's offense last season. He's certainly not a WR1, and the one-year numbers represent that, but he does give Baker Mayfield a big-bodied receiver with a bit of downfield speed and he should benefit some more from Kitchens' complex and effective route concepts.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

    Deone Bucannon, $LB, Buccaneers

    Financial terms: 1 year, $ TBA

    Old team: Cardinals

    Bucannon was one of several players who didn't fit in Steve Wilks' rigid schemes-one wonders why the Cardinals hired a guy in Wilks who had such an aversion to hybrid players when the Cardinals had a ton of them-and his playing time suffered as a result. He'll now be matched with Bucs defensive coordinator Todd Bowles, who generally has a more creative view of things when he's running a defense. It should be a big boon for Bucannon, who can take away some of the sting the Bucs are feeling after losing mobile linebacker Kwon Alexander to the 49ers. Bucannon is more of a safety/linebacker hybrid than a pure linebacker as Alexander is, but he can play that role to a point.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images)

    Ty Nsekhe, OT, Bills

    Financial terms: 2 years, $14.5 million

    Old team: Redskins

    Washington's swing tackle and primary Trent Williams injury replacement over the last few seasons, Nsekhe allowed just one sack and 11 total pressures in 403 snaps last season. In Buffalo's system, he'll likely get starting reps, and though he's not a top-tier player at his position, he's a smart player with excellent technical skills. Getting him for a contract like this is exactly what smart teams do, and given the Bills' preferred reliance on deep passes-which obviously take longer drops and more time for quarterbacks-this is a home-run signing.

    Grade: A+

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    (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)

    Latavius Murray, RB, Saints

    Financial terms: 4 years, $14 million

    Old team: Vikings

    No offense to Mark Ingram, who's probably going to be with a new team in 2019, but the Saints' backfield just got younger, quicker, and a lot more schematically interesting. Murray isn't the pure power sustainer that Ingram has been, but he's ferociously quick as an inside/outside zone runner, he has more value as a receiver than the Vikings really let him show, and he has both breakaway ability and power to break tackles. I don't yet know how Sean Payton will utilize him, but there are few NFL coaches who know better how to optimize running backs for success.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by David Eulitt/Getty Images)

    John Brown, WR, Bills

    Financial terms: 3 years, $27 million

    Old team: Ravens

    When you have a quarterback who can throw deep and is struggling with just about everything else, you want to get him as many downfield guys as possible. The Bills already had Zay Jones and Robert Foster as primary deep threats, and adding Brown to that equation means that offensive coordinator Brian Daboli might lead the league in three-man vertical route combinations. Brown led the Ravens last year with seven passes thrown 20 or more yards in the air for 266 yards and two touchdowns in a passing offense without a credible deep-throwing quarterback. He could double that deep catch total in Buffalo.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)

    Cole Beasley, WR, Bills

    Financial terms: 4 years, $29 million

    Old team: Cowboys

    The Bills have added to their receiver corps in free agency with outside speed merchant John Brown, and now have also added Beasley, a prolific slot man over the last seven seasons. Beasley's value in this offense might be a bit overcooked only because he doesn't really work outside-he's a slot guy through and through, and one wonders how second-year quarterback Josh Allen will be conversant with quick angular stuff and option routes. This may be a bigger hit to the Cowboys than it is a boon for the Bills.

    Grade: B-

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    (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)

    Jordan Hicks, LB, Cardinals

    Financial terms: 4 years, $36 million

    Old team: Eagles

    Certainly one of the more versatile and underrated linebackers in this free-agency period, Hicks will add a ton to Arizona's front seven, already enhanced with the presence of Terrell Suggs. Hicks' injury history is the only reason he wasn't a Tier-1 guy, and the contract numbers reflect that. If Hicks stays healthy in the Valley of the Sun, this is a veritable steal.

    Grade: B+

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    (Photo by Peter Aiken/Getty Images)

    Billy Turner, OL, Packers

    Financial terms: 4 years, $28 million

    Old team: Broncos

    It's not that Turner is a horrible player-he's only given up four sacks in the last two seasons-but giving Turner mid-tier offensive line money when he's basically a swing guard/tackle guy in terms of ideal positioning says that after their defensive spending spree, the Packers are spackling their offensive line together and paying a premium price for it. Ideally, they'll reinforce their line in the draft, because this isn't the long-term solution it appears to be.

    Grade: C-

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    (Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports)

    Tashaun Gipson, S, Texans

    Financial terms: 3 years, $22 million

    Old team: Jaguars

    The Texans will lose starting cornerbacks Kareem Jackson and Kevin Johnson and starting safety Tyrann Mathieu when free agency becomes official, so they had to do something to stop the bleeding. Taking Gipson for this kind of money is questionable at best-Gipson had a bit of a down year last year, tape showed a decreasing ability to stick and stay with receivers, he'll be 29 when the 2019 season starts, and one wonders if this deal takes the Texans out of the Earl Thomas market.

    Grade: C

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    (Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sports)

    Teddy Bridgewater, QB, Saints

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Saints

    Bridgewater had more money on the table from the Dolphins, but reports indicate that he's happier staying in New Orleans and possibly replacing Drew Brees at some point. Beset by injuries throughout his career, Bridgewater is an above-average quarterback when healthy, one of the best backups in the league, and a nice fit for Sean Payton's multi-tiered offense. Assuming this is a low veteran deal, it's a nice get for both sides.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports)

    Thomas Davis, LB, Chargers

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Panthers

    The Chargers are in need of linebacker help, and Davis-the only player ever to recover successfully from three separate ACL injuries-still has a lot left to offer. Davis missed four games in the 2018 season after violating the league's policies on performance-enhancing substances, but still managed 56 solo tackles, 29 stops, and solid coverage for the most part. Just as important is Davis' ability to diagnose offensive tendencies-he'll be a valued addition on the field and in the locker room.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)

    Adrian Amos, S, Packers

    Financial terms: 4 years, $37 million

    Old team: Bears

    The Packers had to upgrade at the safety position after trading Ha Ha Clinton-Dix and limping through the stretch run with Tramon Williams, Kentrell Brice, and Josh Jones. Amos is an immediate upgrade-an outstanding tackler and plus run defender, he can also cover the deep third when asked. This move probably doesn't preclude the Pack from taking another safety early in the draft, but it's a great start to revamping a secondary in desperate need-and given the current safety market, this is a relative steal.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Scott Taetsch/Getty Images)

    Za'Darius Smith, DL, Packers

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Ravens

    After three relatively quiet seasons, Smith busted out at exactly the right time in 2018 with 10 sacks and 61 total pressures. He's a great fit for a Green Bay defensive line in need of pass-rush help because he can bring it from every gap-an above-average edge guy, Smith is able to move inside and get after the quarterback from there, as well.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

    C.J. Mosley, LB, Jets

    Financial terms: 5 years, $85 million

    Old team: Ravens

    Congratulations to the 49ers' Kwon Alexander, who was the NFL's highest-paid inside linebacker for about 15 hours. This is a blockbuster deal, and it assures that the Jets will make the recently-acquired Anthony Barr a full-time edge-rusher, because no team is going to pay two off-ball linebackers this much combined. While Barr has the skill set to be a down-after-down edge guy, Mosley will do for the Jets what he did for the Ravens-provide excellent second-level run defense, boundary-to-boundary pass coverage, and excellent effort at all times. The money's a bit excessive here, but Mosley's effect on the Jets' defense should be similarly transformative.

    Grade: B

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    (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Sheldon Richardson, DT, Browns

    Financial terms: 3 years, $36 million

    Old team: Vikings

    Wow. The Browns now have a starting defensive line of Myles Garrett, Emmanuel Ogbah, the criminally underrated Larry Ogunjobi, and Richardson, and they can still go deep on the best defensive line draft class anyone can remember. Richardson is an outstanding run defender with some pass-rush ability-he tallied five sacks and 47 total pressures for the Vikings last year-and he'll anchor the middle with Ogunjobi, bringing serious problems to opposing offensive lines. Given the financials, there's no downside here.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

    Ja'Wuan James, OT, Broncos

    Financial terms: 4 years, $52 million

    Old team: Dolphins

    This deal will make James the highest-paid right tackle in the NFL, superseding Lane Johnson of the Eagles. James is a decent enough player, but he's no Lane Johnson. Per PFF, he allowed seven sacks and had seven penalties last season, and while he's a pretty good run-blocker, he doesn't present a dominant trait that makes this contract easy to swallow. In a history of decisions that seem to be very outside the box, John Elway has gone there again.

    Grade: C-

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    (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

    Lamarcus Joyner, S, Oakland Raiders

    Financial terms: 4 years, $ TBA

    Old team: Rams

    Pairing Joyner with Karl Joseph gives the Raiders a newly formidable safety duo; both players can play in the box or in deep coverage. Joyner can also move to the slot and has played at linebacker depth at times. Most likely, he'll be Oakland's new deep cover man, but he's the new breed of safety who can do all kinds of things.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports)

    Anthony Barr, DE, Vikings

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Vikings

    Well, this was weird. Barr had a verbal agreement to sign with the Jets for major edge-rusher money, but re-considered overnight and will instead re-sign with the Vikings. Per Albert Breer of The MMQB, Barr will make around $13.5 million per year with his new deal. One would imagine that the Vikings will make him more of a full-time edge-rusher, but we'll have to wait and see on that. A big win for Mike Zimmer, and it leaves the Jets scrambling a bit.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

    Kareem Jackson, CB, Broncos

    Financial terms: 3 years, $33 million

    Old team: Texans

    With Chris Harris still in the fold and Bradley Roby possibly on the move, the Broncos needed another top-level cornerback to pair with Harris. Getting Jackson at this rate is a real win, as the veteran had a great season in 2018, both outside and in the slot. Like Harris, Jackson can play both positions very well, and he didn't give up a single touchdown in 2018 no matter where he played.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

    Josh Bellamy, WR, Jets

    Financial terms: 2 years, $7 million

    Old team: Bears

    Bellamy hasn't done a lot through his time with the Bears-he has 76 catches for 996 yards and five touchdowns through five seasons-but he is a good special-teamer, and he has shown some potential as a speed slot weapon. Perhaps in a more expansive passing game, he'll see more opportunities. The Jets are paying him as a third or fourth receiver, so expect reps in that role.

    Grade: C

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    (Photo by Will Vragovic/Getty Images)

    Devin Funchess, WR, Colts

    Financial terms: 1 year, $13 million

    Old team: Panthers

    The Colts needed a big-bodied receiver to pair with T.Y. Hilton and to give their tight ends more separation, and in that regard, Funchess fits the bill. He caught 44 passes for 549 yards and four touchdowns last season, one year after his career year. Funchess isn't a dynamic route-runner and his catch rate has been a problem throughout his career, but the obvious hope is that he'll see more obvious openings and opportunities in Frank Reich's offense. The one-year amount matches Hilton's per-year average and puts Funchess in the top 15 in that regard, which he hasn't yet earned in terms of on-field production. The Colts are seeing something here others aren't.

    Grade: C

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    (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)

    Tyrann Mathieu, Chiefs

    Financial terms: 3 years, $42 million

    Old team: Texans

    The Chiefs desperately need reinforcements in their secondary-in talent, versatility, and attitude. Mathieu provides all three in spades. Able to play everywhere from the slot to both safety positions to outside cornerback in a pinch, Mathieu allows new defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo to unleash heck with his multiple blitz packages, knowing that things are a bit more in control on the back end. Kansas City has a bit more to do with their defense in the draft, but this is an important signing for a team that, had it had an average defense in 2018, could well have made and won the Super Bowl.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

    Mitch Morse, Bills

    Financial terms: Years TBA, over $11 million per year

    Old team: Chiefs

    The Bills intend to make Morse the league's highest-paid center depending on what Matt Paradis may do with the Jets, and Morse has enjoyed an excellent career in a Chiefs offense that demands a lot of its center in multiple ways. Morse hasn't allowed a sack since his rookie season of 2015, and he'll see a lot of familiar concepts in Brian Daboll's offense.

    Grade: B

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    (Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports)

    Adam Humphries, WR, Titans

    Financial terms: 4 years, $36 million

    Old team: Buccaneers

    In one day, the Bucs lose DeSean Jackson in a trade to the Eagles, and Humphries in free agency to the Titans. More challenges for new head coach Bruce Arians. Primarily a slot receiver with little in the way of deep-threat performance, Humphries is a reliable receiver with a high catch rate, which is mandatory for his type of player.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

    Terrell Suggs, Cardinals

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Ravens

    One of the better pass-rushers of his generation, "T-Sizzle" comes into his 17 th season at age 36 with plenty in the tank, having amassed 56 total pressures and eight sacks in the 2018 season. Suggs should be a formidable rotational presence opposite Chandler Jones. This is most likely a club-friendly veteran deal, and if that's case, it's hard to see any downside.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Quinn Harris-USA TODAY Sports)

    Nick Foles, QB, Jaguars

    Financial terms:4 years, $88 million

    Old team: Eagles

    You want to see what the guarantees are on this one, but the Jaguars had to do something-they were wasting a top-shelf defense and an above-average run game at the altar of Blake Bortles. Foles is scheme-dependent, but he'll have offensive coordinator John DeFilippo, who was his quarterbacks coach for a time in Philly. Foles excels in a relatively simple passing offense with a strong rushing attack, lots of play-action and RPO, and good protection upfront. If he's given all of that, he'll be at least twice the quarterback Bortles ever was. This should not preclude the Jaguars from taking a developmental quarterback high in the draft.

    Grade: A

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    (Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports)

    Frank Gore, Bills

    Financial terms: 1 year, $2 million

    Old team: Dolphins

    Apparently, Frank Gore is going to play running back into the NFL into his late thirties, and why not? The "Inconvenient Truth" gained 722 yards on 156 carries in a dysfunctional Dolphins run game last year, and though he's lost a lot of his breakaway speed at age 35, he's still got short-area power and the will to break tackles. He and LeSean McCoy have a combined age of 75, so that's one point of interest about the Bills' backfield at this point.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by Joe Sargent/Getty Images)

    Jesse James, Lions

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Steelers

    James fits your offense if you need a big target with gradual acceleration who can also pass-block. He won't make Lions fans forget how Eric Ebron succeeded in Indianpolis after he left Detroit, but he'll be a good value pickup, depending on the contract.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Steven Ryan/Getty Images)

    Kenny Vaccaro, S, Titans

    Financial terms: 4 years, $26 million

    Old team: Titans

    The Titans liked Vaccaro's performance over the 2018 season enough to resign him, and it's a good deal for both sides. Vaccaro was frozen out of free agency last year as the safety market mysteriously plummeted, and he's now making up for that. The Titans get more seasons with a guy who can play everywhere from hybrid linebacker to slot defender to deep safety.

    Grade: A

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    (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

    Jamison Crowder, WR, Jets

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Redskins

    Crowder was Washington's primary slot weapon last season, catching 21 passes on 32 targets inside for 287 yards and two touchdowns. He's a smart, tough second or third receiver who can also kick outside, which is exactly what the Jets need.

    Grade: TBA

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    (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)

    Craig Robertson, LB/ST, Saints

    Financial terms: 2 years, $4 million

    Old team: Saints

    Though he's a decent rotational linebacker, Robertson's real value with the Saints is as a primary special teams man. Last season, he had five special teams tackles on 384 snaps,

    Grade: B

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    (Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports)

    Bobby Hart, Bengals

    Financial terms: 3 years, $21 million-plus

    Old team: Bengals

    NFL teams try-often in vain-to put together a solid offensive line through the draft and free agency. And continuity is more important along the offensive line than it is for most other position groups. That's the only valid reason I can think of to re-sign, on a three-year deal for decent right tackle money, a guy in Hart who allowed 10 sacks last season, per PFF, and 16 total over the last two years.

    Grade: D

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    Trey Flowers, DE, Lions

    Financial terms: 5 years, $16-17 million per year

    Old team: Patriots

    It was expected that Flowers would get as much money as any player in this free-agent market. He had 11 sacks and 78 total pressures last season, and he gives the Lions valuable and much-needed speed and power off the edge. Flowers can generate pressure from inside and outside, which gives Detroit head coach (and former Patriots defensive coordinator Matt Patricia) all kinds of flexibility.

    Grade: A

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    (Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports)

    C.J. Uzomah, TE, Bengals

    Financial terms: 3 years, $18 million

    Old team: Bengals

    Uzomah gets a decent chunk of change to re-up with the Bengals after a bit of a breakout season in 2018 in which he caught 43 passes on 64 targets for 439 yards and three touchdowns. An above-average blocker as well, Uzomah became an important part of Cincinnati's offense as Tyler Eifert simply couldn't stay healthy.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

    Justin Coleman, CB, Lions

    Financial terms: 4 years, $36 million

    Old team: Seahawks

    This is a lot of scratch for a primary slot cornerback, but Coleman was very reliable in that role for the Seahawks over the last two seasons. He'll be a welcome addition to a Lions secondary that plays a ton of nickel, and he can roll outside in a pinch.

    Grade: B

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    (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

    Landon Collins, S, Washington Redskins

    Financial terms: 6 years, $84 million

    Old team: Redskins

    This deal makes Collins the NFL's highest-paid safety in terms of total value (beating Eric Berry's $78 million) and total dollars per year ($14 million also beats Berry's $13 million). The $45 million guaranteed, per Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network, also goes $5 million past Berry's. It's a huge number for a guy who is outstanding against the run and the short to intermediate pass, but has his less than stellar moments in deep coverage. Given the ways in which safeties have been undervalued over the last two seasons, it's easy to think of this deal as a market-shifter.

    Grade: B-

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    (Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports)

    Kwon Alexander, LB, 49ers

    Financial terms:4 years, $54 million

    Old team: Buccaneers

    One of the league's most athletic linebackers when healthy, Alexander is coming off a torn ACL that limited him to 366 snaps in 2018. How that affects his formerly elite boundary-to-boundary quickness is yet to be known. If the 49ers are getting the Alexander that patrolled the field for Tampa Bay from 2015 through 2017, he's a valuable addition. But given the circumstances, this seems like a very high price to pay.

    Grade: C

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    (Photo by Thomas Shea/Getty Images)

    Kevin Johnson, CB, Bills

    Financial terms: TBA

    Old team: Texans

    The grade for this deal is dependent on the financials. Johnson, a first-round pick for the Texans in 2015, has had an up-and-down career with the Texans. He had just 65 snaps last season due to concussions, and he's been injured in other ways before. The concussion history is the most disconcerting here, and if the Bills are signing Johnson to be anything but a depth guy, this might be a problem.

    Grade: TBA

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    C(Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

    Jason Peters, OT, Eagles

    Financial terms: 1 year, $10 million (max)

    Old team: Eagles

    Still one of the better and more reliable tackles in the league when healthy, Peters played well enough in 2018 to get a contract re-structure/extension that puts him in Philly for one more season. He allowed just three sacks in 970 total snaps last season, and he's not ceding his position to anyone else just yet.

    Grade: B+

    a group of football players playing a football game: File photo? Getty File photo

    (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

    Trent Brown, OT, Raiders

    Financial terms (TBD): 4 years, $66 million

    Old team: Patriots

    The only reason this deal isn't an "F" grade is because Brown is a good player in a vacuum. But aligning himself with legendary New England offensive line coach Dante Scarnecchia and the Patriots' quick passing game made him one of the NFL's most effective left tackles in 2018. Now, he's going to become the league's highest-paid tackle, only to be coached by Tom Cable, which is like checking into the Plaza and somehow waking up in a questionable motel along the freeway. The Raiders are paying Brown as if he's scheme- and coach-transcendent, which he isn't.

    Grade: D

    a man wearing a hat: File photo? File Photo File photo

    (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

    Eric Weddle, S, Rams

    Financial terms: 2 years, $10.5 million

    Old team: Ravens

    Still one of the better versatile safeties in the league at age 34, Weddle can't patrol the full field like he used to, but he can read receivers and runners as well as anyone in the league. This is a low-money deal for a team in need of smart, consistent safety play to put its defense over the top, and if Weddle is playing in the Super Bowl next February as a result, don't be too surprised.

    Grade: A

    (Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images)

    Dante Fowler, Jr., DE, Rams

    Financial terms: 1 year, $14 million

    Old team: Rams

    Traded from Jacksonville to give the Rams a boost as edge-rusher for the stretch run, Fowler now re-signs with his newer team. He put up four sacks and 30 total pressures (per PFF) during his time in Wade Phillips' defense, and while the team will need to augment his efforts in free agency and the draft, Fowler's a good re-addition-and given the value of the contract, the Rams clearly see potential here.

    Grade: B

    a baseball player holding a bat: File photo? USA TODAY File photo

    (Douglas DeFelice-USA TODAY Sports)

    Danny Amendola, WR, Lions

    Financial terms: 1 year, $5.75 million

    Old team: Dolphins

    Amendola's been a decent slot and outside receiver since his time with the Patriots, and he had a decent season for the Dolphins in 2018 despite an underwhelming passing game. Look for him to get a ton of short-to-intermediate looks from Matthew Stafford in Detroit's high-volume passing game, which is exactly what he's designed to do.

    Grade: B+

    a baseball player holding a bat: File photo? File Photo File photo

    (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

    Malik Jackson, DT, Eagles

    Financial terms: 3 years, $30 million

    Old team: Jaguars

    It seemed as if the entire Jacksonville defense disappointed in 2018 after a torrid 2017, and Jackson was no exception. His sack totals dropped from 10 to four per PFF, and though he maintained a high pressure rate, he wasn't quite the player he was before. He'll get a boost as a Michael Bennett replacement in Philly playing alongside a bunch of great linemen, which should boost his production. The down year does bring a bit of worry, though.

    Grade: B-

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